Privacy

Will Canada follow the GDPR lead in privacy legislation?

Many business in Canada and the US have already updated their privacy policies to bring them into line with the General Data Protection Regulation legislation in the EU. While not everyone was happy about the new regulations, it may well be that Canadian websites who resisted will have to comply with similar regulations in the not too distant future. House committee says privacy laws should apply to political parties by Aaron Wherry, CBC News Jun 19, 2018 MPs recommend expanding data protections and empowering privacy commissioner The House of Commons committee investigating the Cambridge Analytica scandal is recommending significant changes to Canada’s privacy laws, including new rules to govern the activities of political parties. In an interim report, the committee recommends that Canadian privacy laws be updated to offer data protections similar to the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation. The privacy commissioner, the committee says, should also be given the power to make orders, conduct audits, seize documents and impose fines for non-compliance. The committee also proposes that privacy laws be extended to cover political activity. It recommends that online political advertising be subject to new transparency requirements – including disclosure of who paid for an ad and how the ad was targeted at specific audiences. Read more… I don’t think this is a bad thing for consumers and the general public. They should be more aware of what data is collected as they surf the net or search for information, and if they so choose they should have the right to request that their information be deleted and to have that request honored. I do think the GDPR goes too far, both in what they define as privacy data and in the penalties for breaching the act (they seem to have a special hate on for Google and

Chrome and Firefox Extensions Alert You to Stolen Passwords

With new stories about hacked websites and stolen passwords emerging almost daily, here are some new browser tools that alert you if you sign in anywhere using a password that has been breached. Here’s How To Find Out If Your Password Has Been Stolen By Hackers By Robin Andrews, IFLScience.com May 27, 2018 [Statistically, you] are likely to be someone who uses the same password for several logins, across websites or computers. There’s a fairly decent chance that at some point, one or several of your passwords have been stolen and posted on forums for other hackers to try out. Enter, Okta, whose plug-in for Chrome (a version for Firefox is coming soon) lets you know how safe, or unsafe, your passwords really are. Okta is described by CNET as a login management company, which doesn’t sound particularly thrilling. Popping over to their website, it appears that this is indeed what they do, but to put it in a mildly more exciting way: They are the guardians of the virtual gateways, those that stop nefarious hackers getting to you as you log in to whatever digital platform you or your company are using. They’ve recently gone one step further and released a browser plug-in named PassProtect. When you use a password to sign in to Twitter or anything of the sort, it’ll inform you just how many times the password in question has been exposed in a data breach. As noted, PassProtect is currently available as an extension for Chrome only, although they say a version for Firefox is in the works. In the meantime, if you are a Firefox user, you can try a similar add-on called Prevent Pwned Passwords. Prevent Pwned Passwords helps make sure you don’t use any password that’s known to have been part of a

Small businesses may face sanctions under the GDPR

Canadian business may face sanctions under EU’s new privacy law CBC News May 25, 2018 The EU’s General Data Protection Regulation covers everything from giving people an opportunity to obtain, correct or remove personal data about themselves, to outlining rules for disclosing security breaches, to providing easily understood privacy policies and terms of service. Any Canadian business that collects personal information about residents of the European Union — whether they’re tourists, students or online customers — risks maximum fines of $30 million or more if they violate a sweeping new EU privacy law that takes effect Friday. But privacy experts say many small- and mid-sized Canadian companies have only recently become aware that they may be covered by the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation, which was adopted by the 27-country regional government in 2016 with a two-year delay before enforcement starting on May 25, 2018. “Anybody that is collecting personal data from European residents — not only citizens — needs to comply with this,” Ale Brown, founder of Kirke Management Consulting, said in a phone interview from Vancouver. That’s equally true for a boutique fashion company selling purses, a university with students from a European country or a website using cookies or other information tracking features, she said. The GDPR could even affect small tourism-related business such as a resort or tour operator, because they have guests from all over the world. Besides having potentially hefty fines, the GDPR’s scope is also sweeping. It covers everything from giving people an opportunity to obtain, correct or remove personal data about themselves, to outlining rules for disclosing security breaches, to providing easily understood privacy policies and terms of service. One of the criticisms of GDPR has been that it could impose higher administrative costs on every company that wants to comply with
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