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Website Push Notifications: How to Disable Them in Major Browsers

With recent browser updates, it appears that the popups asking whether you want to allow Push Notifications from websites you visit have become more aggressive – or perhaps it’s just that more websites are using this feature. We have nothing enabled on this site to use these popups but here is how to disable these annoying popups in the three major browsers for Windows. Disable all push notifications in Chrome How notifications work By default, Chrome alerts you whenever a website, app, or extension wants to send you notifications. You can change this setting at any time. If you’re browsing in Incognito mode, you won’t get notifications. Allow or block notifications from all sites On your computer, open Chrome. At the top right, click More    > Settings. At the bottom, click Advanced. Under “Privacy and security,” click Content settings. Click Notifications. Block all: Turn off Ask before sending. Block a site: Next to “Block,” click Add. Enter the site and click Add. Allow a site: Next to “Allow,” click Add. Enter the site and click Add. Choose to block or allow notifications: You can also block any sites or apps from sending you notifications. Disable all push notifications in Firefox Open up Firefox, click on the Menu button at the top right, and click Options. Click on Privacy & Security in the left pane. Scroll down to Permissions > Notifications. Click on Settings to the right of Notifications. If there are any websites already listed as okay, click on Remove All Websites. Check the box next to Block new requests asking to allow notifications. Click Save changes. Disable all push notifications in Edge Start Edge and click on the More button at the top right. Scroll down to View Advanced Settings. Scroll down to Website Permissions. I think you

Google Public DNS turns 8.8.8.8 years old

Google Public DNS turns 8.8.8.8 years old by Alexander Dupuy, Software Engineer, Google Online Security Blog August 11, 2018 Once upon a time, we launched Google Public DNS, which you might know by its iconic IP address, 8.8.8.8. Sunday, August 12th, 2018, at 00:30 UTC marks eight years, eight months, eight days and eight hours since the announcement. Though not as well-known as Google Search or Gmail, the four eights have had quite a journey—and some pretty amazing growth! Whether it’s travelers in India’s train stations or researchers on the remote Antarctic island Bouvetøya, hundreds of millions of people the world over rely on our free DNS service to turn domain names like wikipedia.org into IP addresses like 208.80.154.224. Read more… If you haven’t tried Google DNS or other DNS alternatives like OpenDNS, there is a free small utility called DNS Jumper that makes it easy to scan and identify the fastest DNS server in your area, with speed comparisons to all the others tested switch to the DNS server of your choice switch back to your original default DNS server (usually the one used by your Internet Service Provider or ISP) at any time Download DNS Jumper 2.1 for Windows at: Download DNS jumper 2.1 (Free) for Windows

Firefox Users Alert: New TRR feature: why and how to disable it

Mozilla’s new Firefox update puts user security at risk with TRR feature by AnkitGupta, TheWindowsClub.com August 7, 2018 Mozilla is all set to introduce two new features to its Firefox browser in its upcoming patch. Called as ‘DNS over HTTPs’ (DOH) and Trusted Recursive Resolver (TRR), Mozilla says that they are meant to enable additional security, with many security experts thinking otherwise. Signaling out TRR among the two, security experts at Ungleich say that this feature by default routes requests with a 3rd party service; thus making it less secure. With Trusted Recursive Resolver (TRR) turned on as default, any DNS changes that a Firefox user configured in the network will be overridden. This is because Mozilla had partnered with Cloudflare and will resolve the domain names from the application itself through a DNS server of Cloudflare located in the US. This allows Cloudflare to read user’s DNS requests. Lashing out on Mozilla for advertising TRR as a feature that ‘increases security’, the security expert at Ungleich mentions, “From our point of view, us being security geeks, advertising this feature with slogans like “increases security” is rather misleading because in many cases the opposite is the case. While it is true that with TRR you may not expose the websites you call to a random DNS server in an untrustworthy network you don’t know, it is not true that this increases security in general.” Cloudflare on its part, though commits to a ‘pro-user privacy’ policy and the detection of all personally identifiable data after 24 hours, there is no guarantee where a user’s data may finally end up. Mozilla’s TRR disables user’s anonymity With TRR allowing all DNS requests seen by Cloudflare, user’s anonymity stands completely destroyed. Government agencies always have the right to request data from the service owners,

WordPress 4.98, Gutenberg, and Avoiding the Test Run

WordPress 4.9.8 Released by Jeff Chandler, WordPress Tavern August 3, 2018 WordPress 4.9.8 is available for download and is a maintenance release. Headlining this version is the “Try Gutenberg” callout. Note that not everyone will see the callout. Its visibility is determined based on certain criteria. This update is rolling out now so check your dashboards. If you are one of those who is selected for the pretest and you do NOT want to pretest Gutenberg, just click the “Install the Classic Editor” button. As I mentioned in a previous post, there are already some plugins available to prevent Gutenberg and keep the classic editor so, for a while at least, you can avoid Gutenberg at all. But you will be nagged by WordPress because they are pushing this thing.

Google S-Day Arrives: Chrome warns about non-HTTPS sites

True to their word, Google today released version 68 of their Chrome Browser and, as promised, they have changed the way they warn users about potential issues with web sites. In previous versions, Chrome (and Firefox and most other browsers) alerted users to sites that were not using SSL with a red padlock next to the URL, and sites with mixed content displayed an orange padlock. Starting with version 68, Chrome now uses a stronger warning system. If you haven’t yet converted your site to HTTPS / SSL, now is the time to give it serious consideration. You should also check that your site correctly redirects from HTTP to HTTPS in case anyone enters just the domain name into the browser. On their Google Chrome Help page, Check if a site’s connection is secure, they preview what this now looks like to users: Check if a site’s connection is secure To see whether a website is safe to visit, you can check for security info about the site. Chrome will alert you if you can’t visit the site safely or privately. In Chrome, open a page. To check a site’s security, to the left of the web address, look at the security status:  Secure  Info or Not secure  Not secure or Dangerous To see the site’s details and permissions, select the icon. You’ll see a summary of how private Chrome thinks the connection is. What each security symbol means These symbols let you know how safe it is to visit and use a site. They tell you if a site has a security certificate, if Chrome trusts that certificate, and if Chrome has a private connection with a site. Secure Information you send or get through the site is private. Even if you see this icon, always be careful when sharing

Website Performance and Site Speed Tests Revisited

In a previous post from April 2018, Testing WordPress Performance and Site Speed, I discussed an article describing five online tools for testing the page load speeds for your website. Google PageSpeed Insights Pingdom GTmetrix WebPagetest YSlow Browser Plugin Most of these simply test a webpage from the URL submitted and report relative site speed of that page (it’s not always clear relative to what exactly – presumably all other webpages that tool has tested) and then make suggestions on how you can improve the performance of that page. Pingdom allows you to select from one of three locations to use to test your page load speed. WebPagetest expands on this by offering a choice of several locations around the world and in addition allows you to check your page speed with a choice of browsers and devices. More recently, I learned about a new online tool which is similar to those discussed above but with several significant improvements: Website Speed Test | Dotcom-Tools. Dotcom-Tools adds the following features to those offered by their competitors: Tests browser-based load time of all page elements Detects slow or missing elements Tests from your selection of Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, or  various mobile web browsers Provides a complete waterfall report with  charts and graphs Displays results from nearly two dozen global locations all in the same report Conducts tests from each location twice, with the second visit cached to allow you to estimate the effectiveness of the various caching systems used by your page These tests are all absolutely free with no sign-up required. Dotcom Web Site Monitoring also offers a selection of various paid plans as well. In addition to the features of the free service described above, the Pro plans offer Website Performance Monitoring starting at $7.99 USD per month for

Will Canada follow the GDPR lead in privacy legislation?

Many business in Canada and the US have already updated their privacy policies to bring them into line with the General Data Protection Regulation legislation in the EU. While not everyone was happy about the new regulations, it may well be that Canadian websites who resisted will have to comply with similar regulations in the not too distant future. House committee says privacy laws should apply to political parties by Aaron Wherry, CBC News Jun 19, 2018 MPs recommend expanding data protections and empowering privacy commissioner The House of Commons committee investigating the Cambridge Analytica scandal is recommending significant changes to Canada’s privacy laws, including new rules to govern the activities of political parties. In an interim report, the committee recommends that Canadian privacy laws be updated to offer data protections similar to the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation. The privacy commissioner, the committee says, should also be given the power to make orders, conduct audits, seize documents and impose fines for non-compliance. The committee also proposes that privacy laws be extended to cover political activity. It recommends that online political advertising be subject to new transparency requirements – including disclosure of who paid for an ad and how the ad was targeted at specific audiences. Read more… I don’t think this is a bad thing for consumers and the general public. They should be more aware of what data is collected as they surf the net or search for information, and if they so choose they should have the right to request that their information be deleted and to have that request honored. I do think the GDPR goes too far, both in what they define as privacy data and in the penalties for breaching the act (they seem to have a special hate on for Google and

Social Media Outperforms Google for Small Business

Google still dominates the search market but for small business social media, especially Facebook, may be the best marketing tool. How social networks usurp Google’s local search dominance by Wesley Young, Search Engine Land June 18, 2018 Google may dominate most results, but not local search: How Facebook and other social networks take a significant share of local search away from Google. Google claimed that at the end of 2013, it had 540 million monthly active Google+ users. According to SmartInights, quoting data from StaticBrain (paywall), in 2017, it was estimated that only 4-6 million were active. Compare that to almost 1.5 billion daily active Facebook users. In other words, Google’s social media presence is less than 0.4 percent of Facebook’s. Why social will win local search market share A Local Search Association study conducted by Burke in 2016 showed that word of mouth or referrals from friends and family was tied with company websites for second place among resources that consumers used to look up or learn about local products and services…. According to Nielsen’s 2015 Global Trust in Advertising study, consumers trusted recommendations from friends far more than any other source…. In the US, 82 percent of respondents trusted recommendations from people they know. For comparison, 66 percent trusted online consumer opinions (reviews), 61 percent trusted branded websites, 49 percent search ads, 47 percent video ads and 39 percent mobile ads. …. Is it more likely for Google to attract social users or for Facebook to adopt search and commerce into its platform? Based on results to date, Google hasn’t been successful in several attempts at social media. Yet Facebook has incorporated maps, reviews, recommendations and search functions into its platform. Edge: Facebook. And it seems that the changes are having their desired effect. A recent study by

When Windows 10 won’t open links from your email in your browser

I have used Microsoft Outlook as my email client for years and I’m still using Outlook 2010, for the most part successfully. (To be honest, I have thought about switching to Mozilla Thunderbird but I haven’t yet found a way to transfer my existing emails and email archives from Outlook.) Periodically, after an update of some kind or just seemingly out of the blue, clicking on a link in an email no longer opens that link in my default browser, Firefox. There are reports of the same thing happening in Chrome and Internet Explorer, as well as with links in the Windows 10 Mail app. Yesterday, it happened again. When this happened in the past, there was a quick and easy Microsoft Fix-It script that would resolve my problem. Of course, I went immediately to my trusty Fix-It script only to pop up a message that it would not work with Windows 10. The next step was to google the problem for Windows 10. The suggested fixes I got through Google either didn’t work or seemed unnecessarily tedious and complicated. Not encouraging. But there was a common thread, both in the old Microsoft Fix-It and in some of the suggestions from what Google found for me: Resetting the default browser to the Microsoft product (previously Internet Explorer, now Microsoft Edge in Windows 10). I therefore tried the following: Exit from Firefox or your default browser. Go to Default Programs in Windows Settings or Control Panel. Select Microsoft Edge as your default browser. Click on the link in your email to make sure it opens a tab in Edge. Then close Edge. Restart Firefox (or your preferred default browser). Reset your default browser back to the one you prefer: Under Options for your browser, select “Make Firefox (or Chrome, etc.) my

Other ways to market and promote your local business

Here are some ideas for participating in your community and raising positive awareness of your local business… You can’t buy better advertising than this, especially in smaller communities. How Businesses Can Give Back to the Community by Ivan Widjaya, NoobPreneur.com June 9, 2018 Participate in Food Drives If your community ever has a food drive, do what you can to contribute to it and show your good will. Encourage your employees to participate as well… and make sure you don’t forget to arrange for transportation for all the items your company has collected. Sponsor a Youth Organization Chances are good that there’s a youth organization or sports team in the neighborhood in need of a sponsor. Help kids get and stay active by buying them equipment or supplies. Consider offering a space to youth groups needing a place to they can raise money selling candy or cookies. Volunteer If you don’t have the money to help support your community, you can donate your time instead. Look for volunteering opportunities for yourself and your employees, or develop your own. For instance, if you operate an accounting firm, you might offer free classes to help people manage their finances better. Support Local Businesses Support other locally-based business in your community. If there’s one you particularly like, be sure to support it by sending some business their way. Be conscious about how you spend your money, and do what you can to support your local community. Make It Easy for Employees to Support Their Community Offer employees paid time off to volunteer within the community. Look for Ways to Address Local Problems Every community has its share of unique problems. If you’re aware of them, do what you can to solve them. For instance, if you run a restaurant and know there are
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